After 20 Months Of No Sight, Great White Shark Was Spotted At False Bay In Cape Town

After 20 Months Of No Sight A Great White Shark Was Spotted At False Bay In Cape Town. After 20 months of no sighting, a great white shark was seen at False Bay in Cape Town, according to a City of Cape Town official.

After 20 months of no sighting of sharks, a great white shark was seen at False Bay in Cape Town, according to a City of Cape Town official. The person who is responsible of coastal management at the City of Cape Town, Gregg Oelofse, says the shark was seen in the middle of the Seal Island bay in the morning. Shark Spotters went to its Twitter to state that the shark is 4 metres long.

“The [City Of Cape Twon] has informed [Shark Spotters] that a 4m white shark has been spotted in False Bay by [Apex Shark Expeditions]. We are on high alert for any white shark sightings on the inshore and will update the public immediately should we see one,” says Shark Spotters. Greg Olofse says they are assessing the situation and will be able to determine the significance or maybe the comeback of the great white sharks to False Bay.

During the years from 2010, the Shark Spotters have noticed a decrease in the number of sharks. In 2018 there were 50 sharks as compared to the average 205 in the 2010 and 2016 period. However, in 2019, there was no spotting by the Shark Spotters. The City Of Cape Town says the Fish Hoek shark exclusion will be put in place until the 31st of March unless there are high wind pressures and sea conditions that avert the exclusion net being put in place. They ask people to be aware when going to beaches, they also state that there have been other sharks that were regularly seen and don’t pose too much of a threat such as bronze whaler shark.

However, they state that its hard to differentiate between the great white shark and the bronze whaler shark. Gregg Oelofse says, “It is better to avoid being in close proximity to them especially when prey is in the area. As we have seen this morning, the great white sharks may also return at any time.”

by Alexandra Ramaite